Friday, December 2, 2011

The Murals of the Mezquitán Cemetery, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico.


This is not my usual essay.

I take the liberty to announce the publication of my new book

The Murals of the Mezquitán Cemetery,  Guadalajara, Jalisco,  Mexico. 
video
Short video of interior of book. 
                                                    ON AMAZON
This is not totally gratuitous and out of place. I offer here the short essay from the book and in I say.


“Large figures anchor each panel and broad undulating strokes, many of them blue, serveto unite. We see that “things of life” are prevalent: flowers, lovers, music, the market andthe playground. Yet a close look at the faces of the participants tells us that we mightbe in a strange place. A place that is reminding us that “we” are only here a short whileto participate in these activities before passing to what is on the other side of the wall.”

That is the faces fairly universally lack affect in a sea of life and color reminding us that just on the other side is a cemetery.



From the book:

It is my pleasure to introduce you to the mural of the Mezquitán Panteón of Guadalajara Mexico. The Cemetery was founded in 1896 after the closure of the Belen cemetery.

The painting is inspired, in part, by a folk tale about a race to the cemetery by two families for the privilege of having a family member buried there and claiming the prize of the first burial plot free of charge. The race was between a rich and a poor family. The poor family having only the sweat of their brow lost as the rich family had access to a carriage. The social commentary cannot be lost on us. But this is only the starting point as the mural was truly a community project involving financial support from the government, numerous student painters and many suggestions from the community concerning thematic input, from furtive loves to a car accident.

Despite these diverse inputs the work holds together in many ways; size , color and themes. Large figures anchor each panel and broad undulating strokes, many of them blue, serve to unite. We see that “things of life” are prevalent: flowers, lovers, music, the market and the playground. Yet a close look at the faces of the participants tells us that we might be in a strange place. A place that is reminding us that “we” are only here a short while. It is my pleasure to introduce you to the mural of the Mezquitán Panteón of Guadalajara Mexico. The Cemetery was founded in 1896 after the closure of the Belen cemetery. The painting is inspired, in part, by a folk tale about a race to the cemetery by two families for the privilege of having a family member buried there and claiming the prize of the first burial plot free of charge. The race was between a rich and a poor family. The poor family having only the sweat of their brow lost as the rich family had access to a carriage. The social commentary cannot be lost on us. But this is only the starting point as the mural was truly a community project involving financial support from the government, numerous student painters and many suggestions from the community concerning thematic input, from furtive loves to a car accident.

Despite these diverse inputs the work holds together in many ways; size , color and themes. Large figures anchor each panel and broad undulating strokes, many of them blue, serve to unite. We see that “things of life” are prevalent: flowers, lovers, music, the market and the playground. Yet a close look at the faces of the participants tells us that we might be in a strange place. A place that is reminding us that “we” are only here a short while to participate in these activities before passing to what is on the other side of the wall.

The project was conceived by four students all inhabitants of the area and from the University Center for Art, Architecture and Design (CUAAD), Marita Terríquez Guadalupe Oliva Martha, Edith Garcia de la Torre, José Ricardo Solis Rosales and Oscar Fabian Zumaya Covarrubias. Zumaya was the overall sketch artist and Sergio Murillo was the supervising coordinator of the project. All manual labor was donated. It was a reaction to the excessive graffi ti in the neighborhood.

Brian Lynch

www.brianlynchmd.com